Being investigated for drunk driving can be a distressing experience. You may be worried about the chances of being charged and the implications that could have for your personal and professional life. Yet, at this already disquieting time, you may be asked to submit to various tests in order to determine your blood alcohol concentration.

In a previous post, we discussed the various ways in which your BAC can be tested and the samples that might be required in order for this to be done. But how reliable are these tests and what are the implications if you submit to one? Of course, this depends in part on whether you had been drinking before the test. If you suspect that you may have been over the limit, this could show up in the test.

However, there are many ways in which BAC tests can be misleading or inaccurate. Breathalyzers may be poorly maintained, while blood samples could get mixed up or contaminated in the lab. It is important to take all of this into consideration when preparing your defense. A charge does not guarantee a conviction.

If you are under investigation for following accepted procedures as a driver, it stands to reason that the professionals responsible for evaluating the samples taken should also be held to high standards. Your attorney can call for evaluation of lab protocol, analysis of the evidence and even expert opinions on how the substances in question typically affect performance.

It can seem like a lot to take in, but there is support available. If you would like to know more about the implications of blood alcohol tests, our page on DUI forensics may have some of the information you seek.