Drunk driving patrols will increase throughout the holidays in Arizona

The holidays are a time to engage in overconsumption - of turkey, pie and delicious drinks. This is common among the colder months. November, December and part of January often include extra time around family and friends. This may lead to more season-inspired festivities.

However, in addition to this time of happiness, the holidays may come equipped with drunk driving checkpoints and saturation patrols. This is true in parts of Arizona. Beginning at the close of November 2013, drunk driving checkpoints and saturation patrols will be in place every weekend in some areas.

Arizona criminal law mandates that judges impose penalties, even for first-time drunk driving offenders. This includes jail time, fines and court expenses. In the state, many offenders reap several other consequences of a conviction, including loss of driving rights, loss of employment and more.

As a result, officers in the state are informing motorists about future investigations. To help avoid criminal charges, authorities recommend the following:

  • Plan and arrange a ride home from a designated driver
  • Take public transportation, such as the bus
  • Secure a cab
  • Stay at a friend's place, which is a short walking distance from the location of alcohol consumption
  • Purchase a Breathalyzer, which can help prevent irresponsible motorists from getting behind the wheel
  • Do not give into peer pressure to drive; if a friend requests a ride home, call a cab

These tips can make enjoyment during the holidays free of criminal charges.

Drunk driving Charges

However, accidents can happen or particular circumstances can place a motorist under criminal investigation - regardless of one's intentions. If you are nevertheless slapped with criminal charges for driving under the influence, it helps to speak with a qualified attorney. A lawyer can examine your case and see if your rights were violated upon arrest.

For example, many drunk driving charges precipitate out of motor vehicle stops (sometimes from the aforementioned saturation patrols). When this happens, a legal professional may look into the following:

  • Whether police stopped you without cause
  • Whether police informed you of your rights (such as one to an attorney)
  • Whether the Breathalyzer test was administered correctly
  • Whether other tests, such as a blood test, were performed pursuant to the arrest

If you want to learn more about the specifics of your case, speak with a professional criminal law attorney in your area.